SA's Only Antiques, Collectables And Decorative Arts Magazine
Spode

spode1The Spode company produced high quality ceramic products on the same factory site in Stoke-upon-Trent, North Staffordshire, England since it was established by Josiah Spode I in the late 1700s. Even before Spode arrived, this area was well known as “The Potteries,” one of Britain’s most important districts for the production of porcelain. Josiah Spode I (1733-1797) established his famous pottery manufactory in Stoke-upon-Trent in about 1770 completing the purchase of the factory in 1776. Prior to this he had had two partnerships. In 1778 his son Josiah Spode II (1755-1827), already trained by his father in the manufacture of pottery, opened premises in Fore Street, Cripplegate in the City of London in order to trade in pottery and was highly successful in sales and marketing. It was compulsory to belong to one of the Guilds to operate a business in London at this time. Such was the newness of the pottery trade there was no relevant guild so Josiah II joined the Guild of Spectacle Makers!

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Royal Crown Derby

royalcrownCOMPANY HISTORY
Nottingham Road (Circa 1756-1848) In 1756, three men, John Heath a Derby banker, Andrew Planche a ‘china maker’ and William Duesbury an enameller from Staffordshire, entered into an agreement by which they became “co-partners together as well in the art of making English China as also in buying and selling all sorts of wares belonging to the art of making china”.

John Heath, an Alderman of Derby, was the financier of the venture, contributing £1,000; Andrew Planche the potter, and William Duesbury the artist and motivating force. The factory was established on the Nottingham Road. Derby is located on the River Derwent near Trent. Proximity to the river allowed Duesbury and Planche to easily import and export raw materials as well as export the finished product. Additionally, Derby was known for its prolific silk trade and as a haven for artists. In 1750, the doors of the Chelsea Works factory opened. The factory brought industry to the small town of Derby and helped the town prosper. As the companys figurines and dinnerware became popular throughout Europe, the Chelsea Works began attracting some of the most skilled artists of the day.

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Bureau functionality

Bureau300 years and counting – the bureau is showing no signs of diminishing in popularity. It is proactive, takes up little space and is useful with its pigeonholes, drawers and plenty of cupboards space for books and other treasures. Most are English but you do occasionally see French in woods such as oak, mahogany, pine, walnut, rosewood or kingwood with Rococo features.

SECRET COMPARTMENTS:
Bureaus are renowned for secret compartments. Almost all secret compartments are around the pigeonholes, so check here first. If there are any panels that don’t seem necessary, you will probably find a secret compartment behind them. The most common secret compartments are behind vertical panels either side of a central pigeonhole. They are either arched panels or fashioned as a book spine for added concealment. These can usually just be pushed or pulled out from behind. Another common compartment is the sliding panel on the writing surface, that will reveal a cavity beneath. If your drawer is set lower down than usual it probably has a hidden compartment.

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CAVIAR COLLECTABLES

caviarDating back 250 million years to prehistoric times, the sturgeon has been a part of the Middle Eastern and Eastern Europe diet for the majority of man’s history.

The word “caviar” comes into English from the Italian import in the 16th century & stems from the Persian word for egg. Although the Persian term technically refers to both the sturgeon and the roe, it has come down into English meaning only the egg. Caviar from fish other than the sturgeon usually has an adjective naming such origins, such as “salmon caviar.”

The Persians were early cultivators of caviar from the Caspian and later the Black Seas, believing in the roe’s vague medicinal qualities. Others in the area learned the value; Ancient Greek writers mention caviar, including Aristotle, who said the arrival of the caviar indicated the end of the banquet. Later, it was apparently a staple in Roman parties, well known for their excesses. Caviar seems to have been reserved for use by the upper echelon in both these societies even though it was relatively easily available.

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FORD MUSTANG

fordIn 1964, Ford introduced the Mustang. It was a near-instant success and spawned an entire sector of so-called “pony” cars that aimed to ride on the coattails of the Mustang’s success.

In Mustang: A Complete Guide, published in 1965, Iacocca explained how in one package, Mustang satisfied customers’ need, “. . .for basic transportation and their desire for comfort, style, handling and a choice in performance capabilities.” Since Ford’s goal was profitability, the Mustang body and suspension was a modified Falcon platform to minimize manufacturing costs.

Equipped with a standard six-cylinder engine and manual transmission, ads proclaimed Mustang’s base price started at $2368 f.o.b. Detroit. There were options galore, as the ad copy explained Mustang was designed to be designed by you. First year sales were over 500,000 units.

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TEA TIME - ETIQUETTE AND THE HISTORY OF AFTERNOON TEA

teatimeKing Charles II (1630 - 1685) while in exile, married the Portuguese Infanta Catherine de Braganza (1638–1705). Catherine’s dowry was the largest ever registered in world history. Both he and his Portuguese bride were confirmed tea drinkers. When the monarchy was re-established, they brought this foreign tea tradition to England with them. Her influence made tea more popular amongst the wealthier classes of society, as whatever the royals did, everyone else wanted to copy. Soon tea mania swept across England, and it became the beverage of choice in English high society, replacing ale as the national drink.

The tea itself and the delicate pieces of porcelain for brewing and drinking it were displayed in the closet, and inventories for wealthy households during the 17th and 18th centuries list tea equipage not in kitchens or dining rooms but in these small private closets or boudoirs.

During the 18th century tea gardens became popular. The whole idea of the garden was for ladies and gentlemen to take their tea together outdoors surrounded by entertainers. They attracted everybody including Mozart and Handel. The tea gardens made tea all the more fashionable to drink, plus they were important places for men and women to meet freely.

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KING OF MING

mingDubbed the “King of Ming” – Robert Elisworth, a prominent dealer of modern Chinese paintings, Ming dynasty furniture, archaic jade and other examples of Asian art who helped amplify many of the major Asian collections in the West, died on Aug. 3 in Manhattan. He was 85. He was born in Manhattan on July 13, 1929. His mother was an opera singer & his father a dentist.

Mr. Ellsworth, who never graduated from high school, was interested in China and in antiques from the time he was a boy. As a teenager, he worked in a Manhattan antiques gallery, where he met Alice Boney, then the leading dealer in Asian art in the city. She took him under her wing, and what he learned from her about Chinese porcelain, painting and furniture was the fundament of a career that placed him among the boldest, most prolific and most prescient dealers of Asian art in the country.

Mr. Ellsworth’s clients included major U.S. museums and many important collectors, among them John D. Rockefeller III, whose nearly 300 pieces – including Chinese ceramics, Indian bronzes and Southeast Asian sculptures – were given to the Asia Society after his death in 1978.

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SILVER SPLENDOUR

silverNothing can match a table decked out in silver or silver-plate. So many times I ask people if they know the difference between silver and silver-plate? It is important as a collector to be able to identify the different types of silver and the many hallmarks. American Sterling is simple and to the point whilst British silver has the passant mark signifying silver of a 925 standard. Many silver-plated items have the A1 marking or “quadruple plate” or “EPNS’.

Collecting is often so personal so look at your life and how you live and then choose a style that represents your specific taste. Once you have done this look at the period that reflects your style and then look into the different silver companies and makers. Silver makers over the generations have represented so many diverse eras that I have no doubt that you will find something that suits you and your home perfectly. However, I believe one mustn’t be scared to mix different periods as this adds dimension to a collection. If you decide to collect flat ware it is fun to do a harlequin set that includes many different patterns from different factories. A dining room table set with silver centerpieces and cutlery as well as bon-bon and serving dishes can make for a most lavish dining experience.

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THE WRITTEN WORD

writtenTHE MYSTERY OF THE VOYNICH MANUSCRIPT - HOLY GRAIL, HEARSAY OR HOAX?

It’s known as the world’s most mysterious manuscript - an illustrated tome that’s baffled experts for centuries. Known as the Voynich Manuscript, although librarians at Yale University’s rare books vault in Connecticut simply refer to it as manuscript MS 408, it is written in bizarre ‘alien’ characters and illustrated with sketches no one can understand. The book’s author is unknown and it has no official title. The manuscript measures 23.5 by 16.2 by 5 centimetres, with hundreds of vellum pages collected into 20 quires - some of which have unusual fold-out shapes making up 240 pages (although from the numbering gaps there could have been up to 272 pages originally). Based on modern analysis, it has been determined that a quill pen and iron gall ink were used for the text and figure outlines. Colored paint was crudely applied to the figures, possibly at a later date.

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Focus on Furniture

furniturefocusFurniture has been around, in some form or another, for centuries. Fashion in furniture has always revolved around the practicality of storage and utility and has changed according to the needs and lifestyles of consumers. In this issue we look at the various types of antique furniture used for storage. Pieces like wardrobes, cabinets and drawers have largely been replaced today by built-in cupboards and fitted dressing rooms but there has been a strong return to featuring a grand armoire as a centrepiece to a room or including a chest of drawers, credenza or chest to add balance and interest to a décor setting.

Wardrobe:
Called an ‘armoire” in French, the wardrobe is a standing storage closet. The earliest form of storing clothes was in a chest – it was with the rise of the nobility who needed chest, cupboards etc for their sumptuous clothes that the wardrobe came into its own and developed to include hanging space, sliding shelves and drawers. Originally made from oak in the 17th Century and referred to by the British as an ‘oakley’, it was later made from American walnut and then evolved in the 19th Century into more elaborate forms made from mahogany and satinwood. Sometimes referred to as a ‘tallboy’, this term, it is believed, came about as the wardrobe’s size was determined by the ‘8 small men’ method – i.e. the average double size wardrobe was made to hold, in its capacity, 8 small men.

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ADVERTISE in The Collector

advertiseDo you need new customers or have a need to increase your revenue?
Have great products you want to “tell” the collector about?
Have any upcoming Events, Auctions or Fairs?
With a readership of 15 000 your advert is in the right hands.

The Collector is the most credible trade magazine in South Africa on its subject matter: Antiques, Art, Collectables & Decorative Arts.

Did you know trade publication advertising yields significant benefits beyond enquiries? It also builds awareness of your company, new and existing product lines, your location and how collectors can get in touch with you. This leads to a credibility in your brand and name as well as your reputation. Choosing a well-known, established brand builds buyer confidence and puts you in a league of “very credible” in a highly competitive market.

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‘Battle of Britain’ movie airplanes sold

battleplanesThe rare fighters from the 1969 Battle of Britain movie have been sold to restorers in the United States and Europe, according to the agent handling the sale.

Wilson Connell “Connie” Edwards, the irascible 80-year-old pilot who coordinated the movie stunts and took the airplanes as payment, has stored most of them in a dusty, west Texas hangar for more than 40 years.

“All of the airplanes have been sold, and they will be gone by the end of the year,” said Simon Brown of Platinum Fighters, which handled the sale. “We had multiple full-price offers for each airplane. They are going to three different buyers who plan to restore them to top flying condition.”

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Revealed: How Jackie O's nude beach photos that caused global media storm in 1972 were part of four-year smear campaign by her own HUSBAND Aristole Onassis

JackieOThe infamous nude pictures of Jackie Kennedy Onassis on a beach that caused a media storm in 1972 were part of a widespread smear campaign by her own husband, a new book reveals. The former First Lady married Greek tycoon Aristotle 'Ari' Onassis in 1968 after he wooed her with gifts and declarations of love. But throughout the turbulent four-year marriage Ari pursued his not-so-secret affair with opera singer Maria Callas - while allegedly using his press contacts to publicly discredit her. The revelation comes from noted Kennedy author Christopher Andersen in his upcoming book The Good Son: JFK Jr. and the Mother He Loved. The biography about Jackie's son describes how Ari bullied his new wife - constantly deriding her as 'The Widow' during interviews, according to an excerpt published by the New York Daily News.

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Chippendale Changed the way furniture looks.

chippendaledeskMost people associate Thomas Chippendale with Chippendale furniture of Philadelphia. But he actually lived and worked in England. Only his designs made it over the great pond. Thomas Chippendale's new and different-looking chairs and tables were the vogue in England, but it was at least 1755 before cabinetmakers in America copied any of Chippendale's designs.

And while cabinetmakers in Philadelphia used walnut and mahogany for their designs, those in Bermuda used native cedar, stained to look like mahogany. These Bermuda pieces can fool many collectors. However, the cedar has a decidedly warm orange tinge to it which distinguishes it from mahogany.

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Ivory

ivoryIvory is a material that is already fascinated mankind for thousands of years. King Salomon of the Israelites (1000 BC) had a fleet to provide him with gold and ivory (See 2 Chronicles, 9,21) and his throne was inlaid with ivory (1 Kings, 10,18). In the book Songs of Songs, Chapter 7, Verse 5, the neck of a beautiful lady is compared with an ivory tower and in the litany of the Holy Virgin of the catholic and orthodox churches, the Virgin Mary is praised as an “Ivory Tower”.

The popularity of ivory for handles of table ware, keys of piano’s, decorative carvings and jewellery has cost the elephant population dearly. In 1930 there were still 5 million African elephants around and nowadays a paltry 250.000-500.000 are left.

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Praise be! Bob, 85, defies death threats from Satanists to return derelict church to its former glory

BobwebIt has been struck by a German bomb, torn apart by American GIs and left in squalor by a pagan cult.
So when the ruins of an ancient church were discovered in thick woodland by Bob Davey, he could have been forgiven for thinking its fate had already been sealed.
Instead, the determined church warden used his retirement to embark on a 22-year crusade to return the dilapidated building to its former glory – despite receiving a death threat from the cult.

But even he was surprised when his noble DIY effort threw up an unexpected gift, unearthing ancient paintings inside its ivy-covered walls.

The images depict the Holy Trinity and the Last Judgment and are thought to have been created in 1090, soon after the Norman Conquest.
Believed to be the oldest wall paintings in Britain, they have seen the tiny church become an international tourist attraction. They have even earned Mr Davey, 85, an MBE after Prince Charles made several visits to the church.
Mr Davey heard about the tower in 1992 when his late wife Gloria came across it on a ramble near Houghton-on-the-Hill, Norfolk, with her WI group.

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Rupert Museum

rupertAt the bottom end of historic Dorp Street in Stellenbosch, on the banks of the Eersterivier, is what appears to be a whitewashed cellar set in a vineyard. It is actually the Rupert Museum, home to a superb collection of South African and International art.

The Rupert Museum showcases the private art collection of wellknown South African industrialist the late Dr Anton Rupert and his wife Huberte which they collected from 1940 to 2006.

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The real Lives of Others: German tourists relive the Communist East by spending a night in a Stasi bunker - with 'basic training' and authentic military rations (but they escape to a sauna at the end)

Stasi-BunkerGermans have just marked 25 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, but it seems some can't resist reliving the 'bad old days' of Communism.
Deep in the forests of former East Germany they are spending the night in an authentic Stasi bunker - complete with military uniforms, rations and formal training for a Cold War chemical attack.
Teenagers not yet born when the wall fell are among those signing up for the 14-hour tour at the Bunkermuseum Frauenwald, a 38,750 sq ft underground complex which once had enough supplies to last 130 occupants up to a year.Hidden in the woods near the city of Suhl, it was one of at least 15 similar bunkers meant to serve as command and administrative centres in case of war.
The airtight bunker - whose twin access staircases were concealed inside a warehouse - had decontamination units and oxygen tanks in case of a chemical weapons attack in the world outside.
It also had cooking facilities, bedrooms, a dining room, its own power supply and a command centre which used telegraph wires and a radio transmitter to keep up contact with the outside world.

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Collecting Antique Jade

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DO YOU HAVE AN ANTIQUE OR COLLECTABLE THAT YOU WOULD LIKE VALUED?

antiquevalueBRING IT ALONG TO THE ANTIQUES FAIR AT NELSON MANDELA SQUARE THIS SUNDAY 5TH OCTOBER 2014

Members of the public who think they have something of value in the way of antiques and collectables – from jewellery to furs; from silver to glassware; from coins to porcelain; from collectable art to Chinese antiques – can bring their treasures along to the Antiques Fair on Sunday 5th October and specialists in a variety of collecting fields will be happy to give a free valuation.

Says Clyde Terry, organizer of the Fair, “It is amazing what people have hidden away in their cupboards – often antiques that were handed down from generation to generation, with often huge historical value and which could be worth quite a bit. Generally, antique dealers charge to evaluate an item, but at the Nelson Mandela Square Antiques Fair our group of dealers who are all members of the NAADA Association of antique & collectable dealers, are happy to give an evaluation for FREE this Sunday 5th October from 9.30am to 4pm.”

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The Secret to why People collect

collecting1A recent shopper who stumbled across the Antiques Fair at Nelson Mandela Square came to the information table and asked us, “what is it that these collectors know that I should also know” as she marvelled at all the people totally absorbed in browsing the over 60 tables at the Faire.

An interesting question and one that people all over the world are asking ... what makes antique collecting so desirable? Online site www.mint.com called antiques the ‘eye candy of investments” which is a very apt description. Unlike other investments – like stocks and bonds which are all about numbers – antiques are about heritage, beauty, craftsmanship – and ultimately about investments. The other intriguing aspect to collecting has to do with the search... the find... the discovery .... and hopefully the windfall that could make you some money!

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Dambusters together again: World's last two airworthy Lancaster Bombers called Thumper and Vera fly over site where famous raid was practiced as a tribute to crews killed in Second World War

DambustersThe aircraft swooped over the Derwent Dam in Derbyshire three times this afternoon on return flight to RAF Coningsby in Lincolnshire as part of the Southport Air Show.

The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight's bomber Thumper, based at Lincolnshire, was joined by Canadian Lancaster Vera from a museum in Ontario for the demonstration in the Peak District.

Thousands of aviation enthusiasts watched as the Bombers paid tribute to Dambusters crew members who practised in the same area in 1943 at 4pm today.

Derwent Dam was where Wing Commander Guy Gibson trained his squadron for their historic nocturnal assaults on the Mohne, Eder and Sorpe dams - all crucial to Hitler’s industrial heartland in the Ruhr Valley.

Gibson’s force had to fly across occupied Europe at night, so low that some were killed by power lines, and drop untried bouncing bombs – with unprecedented accuracy – in full view of the enemy’s guns.

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Marble statues, chandeliers, walls lined with gold - and stacks of jokes: Inside Joan Rivers's opulent New York apartment 'where Marie Antoinette would have lived if she had the money'

joanriversA dazzling gem of old-school showbusiness, it seems only right that her living room ceilings scaled 30ft-high, and velvet drapes framed the vast windows.

The 5,000-square-foot penthouse is held up by gold pillars.

And in every corner of the opulent New York apartment sit stacks of index cards with jokes spanning her entire career.


The comedienne, who died last week at the age of 81, once described the Upper East Side condo as 'where Marie Antoinette would have lived if she had the money'.

The limestone mansion was built in 1910 for society figure John R Drexel and his socialite wife.


In 1959, it welcomed Ernest Hemingway as a tenant in one of the one-bedroom apartments. He installed a study and hoped to write but found they city too oppressive and soon left.

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St Johns College

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